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DNS problems with Ubuntu? Disable dnsmasq with NetworkManager

Ubuntu LogoOn Ubuntu, if you suddenly cannot resolve DNS addresses anymore, though your network connection is up, you might just have run into a problem with dnsmasq (a local DNS server) that is used by NetworkManager. This post is about disabling dnsmasq and using the DNS servers advertised by your network directly instead.

Is it a DNS problem?

A good indication that you are facing a DNS problem on your machine is when you are connected to a network (meaning you still have an IP address assigned), but your internet connection suddenly stops working, and you are unable to ping DNS addresses like www.google.com:

ping www.google.com # unknown host

but you are still able to ping IP-addresses like 8.8.8.8:

ping 8.8.8.8 # works fine

This looks like you are not able to resolve DNS addresses any more – but you are still correctly connected to your network and to the internet.

What could cause this problem on Ubuntu?

Ubuntu uses NetworkManager, which in turn uses dnsmasq: a local DNS server running on your machine. As dnsmasq is started locally, redirecting DNS requests to the local address 127.0.0.1 would be fine in such a setup. You can see this being used by looking at your /etc/resolv.conf file: if it shows the following line, a local DNS server is in use:

nameserver 127.0.0.1

However, with certain setups you might run into problem when using this way of resolving DNS addresses. This might be the case e.g. when you are using a different program in parallel to manage your connections, which is not cooperating with dnsmasq well.

What could be the solution?

An easy solution is to try if your machine works fine without using dnsmasq. In this case DNS with be resolved not using a local dnsmasq DNS server but using the DNS server advertised via DHCP. To disable dnsmasq with NetworkManager, comment out the dns=dnsmasq line in /etc/NetworkManager/NetworkManager.conf:

# dns=dnsmasq

This will prevent NetworkManager from starting a dnsmasq instance, hence will prevent it from locally resolving DNS lookups. DNS lookups will then be done using the DNS servers advertised to your machine from DHCP. You can check that this actually worked as follows: after a reboot (clears all possible cached DNS servers info on your machine) and connecting to a network you should see actual DNS servers showing up in /etc/resolv.conf (with actual IP-addresses of course) in the place of the former 127.0.0.1 one:

nameserver x.x.x.x
nameserver y.y.y.y
nameserver z.z.z.z

Reduce pdf file size with GhostScript pdf compression under Linux/Unix

March 19, 2018 Leave a comment

We frequently need to mail pdf files that are too big for regular mail services, such as a 40MB pdf file with a maximum 10MB send restriction. In such situations quick and effective pdf compression comes in handy that does not reduce the quality to a level of the file becoming unusable.

GhostScript

GhostScript LogoUnder Linux and Unix-like systems GhostScript is one of the most powerful tools (probably the most powerful one) to manipulate files like pdf, ps, etc. If you are on a Linux/Unix-like system and need a job with pdf files done check out the “How to use GhostScript” site. It’s not unlikely that GhostScript already has a built in solution to your problem. Consequently it also features a way of effectively compressing pdf files with different options and settings.

GhostScript pdf compression

Effective pdf compression is possible with GhostScript using a single command (adapted from here and here):

gs -sDEVICE=pdfwrite -dCompatibilityLevel=1.4 -dPDFSETTINGS=/screen -dNOPAUSE -dQUIET -sOutputFile=outputfile.pdf inputfile.pdf

-dPDFSETTINGS= specifies the quality level of the pdf file. This effects embedded pixel graphics (also adapts embedded color profiles) and is the main option for controlling the compression level, thereby the resulting file size:

  • -dPDFSETTINGS=/screen (72 dpi images)
  • -dPDFSETTINGS=/ebook (150 dpi images)
  • -dPDFSETTINGS=/printer (300 dpi images)
  • -dPDFSETTINGS=/prepress (300 dpi images, color preserving)
  • -dPDFSETTINGS=/default

Other switches: the output is written as pdf (-sDEVICE=pdfwrite), the pdf compatibility level is set to 1.4 (-dCompatibilityLevel=1.4), the process does not require user interaction (-dNOPAUSE and -dQUIET), and GhostScript skips the startup message (-dQUIET).

Categories: Linux, Misc Tags: , , , , , , , ,

apt-get: install software/packages in specific version

February 5, 2018 Leave a comment

Sometimes there is a need to install a specific version of software for it to be compatible to other software, already have certain bug fixed, or because we need specific features. And sometimes there are multiple versions of the software available in the repos of your Linux machine, which allows for selecting the version that you want to have instead of just installing the default version. With apt this is possible – however, be careful to not install incompatible versions of software that causes conflicts with other things on your machine.

We are now going to demonstrate installing a specific version of fish, the user friendly interactive shell. At the time of writing there is only version 2.2.0.3 available in the Ubuntu 16.04.3 repositories, but we need at least version 2.3.x, as this is where fish became compatible to fzf, the fuzzy command-line finder (which is a very helpful tool btw). At the time of writing the latest version of fish in the Ubuntu PPA of fish 2.x is 2.7.x. We therefore at first need to add its PPA to make the version we need available to apt:

sudo apt-add-repository ppa:fish-shell/release-2
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install fish

Now, to see all versions of the desired package available for installation on your machine with apt execute:

apt-cache madison fish

In our example we see:

fish | 2.7.0-1~xenial | http://ppa.launchpad.net/fish-shell/release-2/ubuntu xenial/main amd64 Packages
fish |    2.2.0-3 | http://fi.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu xenial/universe amd64 Packages

We can also look at some more details with:

apt-cache policy fish

In our example we see:

fish:
  Installed: (none)
  Candidate: 2.7.0-1~xenial
  Version table:
     2.7.0-1~xenial 500
        500 http://ppa.launchpad.net/fish-shell/release-2/ubuntu xenial/main amd64 Packages
     2.2.0-3 500
        500 http://fi.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu xenial/universe amd64 Packages
        100 /var/lib/dpkg/status

where 2.7.0-1~xenial is the exact identifier of the version we want to install for our scenario. We can now install this version using apt by setting the additional SW parameter:

sudo apt-get install SW=version

which in case of our example is:

sudo apt-get install fish=2.7.0-1~xenial

Done!

Redshift: protect your eyes during long nights in front of your PC

January 20, 2018 Leave a comment

For the night owls amongst us: looking at our screens during long night sessions – thereby at the whole spectrum of visible light from blue to red – means accepting a bunch of unhealthy drawbacks. For example: as the blue part of the spectrum of visible light is usually only visible during daytime our bodies have adapted to using it as a “clock” mechanism: while we see blue light we i.e. release hormones that keep us awake. That can e.g. make falling asleep more difficult/can cause insomnia when we have worked in front of a monitor for a couple of hours until late in the night. Therefore, besides dimming monitors (reduces the contrast to the dark surroundings), reducing the amount of blue light during night sessions and causing a tinge of red on our monitors is a good thing – not only for our eyes, but also for our bodies as a whole.

How to cause a redshift on your screen

Luckily for the night owls amongst us this problem has been recognized and addressed for different platforms already: for example, even many mobile phones provide for the functionality to redshift screen colors nowadays. For Linux, applications that do this job for us include redshift, openlux, and f.lux (the latter seems to be the original thing but is closed source). My current personal recommendation would be to use redshift, as it’s open source, included in the repositories of all major distributions, easy configurable, and does the job with a single command on your terminal. One word for the curious: from the technical perspective redshift relies on an X server extension to function.

Redshift logo

Redshift project logo

In terms of features redshift automatically adjusts screen colors to better match what the natural light would be – which would be caused by a sun that has probably already set hours ago, meaning there should be no blue light at all. redshift uses your location and time to adjust the screen colors. It provides for deriving the location automatically, but I personally like providing it by hand (see example below). Next to the location the second important setting is what you want your screen colors to be during daytime and nighttime (the color temperature in K to be exact). Both settings can be provided as parameters when calling redshift from the terminal:

redshift -t DAYTEMPERATURE:NIGHTTEMPERATURE -l LAT:LON

For example, I use those color temperatures and coordinates (for the latter providing exact data is not as important as it might seem):

redshift -t 6500:3200 -l 48:14

One more hint: of course you can autostart redshift with i3 by adding this line to your ~/.i3/config/i3.config:

exec --no-startup-id redshift -t 6500:3200 -l 48:14

 

git latexdiff usage: visually highlight changes in version controlled Latex files

October 2, 2017 1 comment

This is a follow-up post to latexdiff-git, which is outdated by now.

latexdiff is a powerful tool that uses two Latex files to generate a third Latex file in which differences between the first two files are visually highlighted. latexdiff is especially useful when comparing an old with a new version of the same Latex file. However, latexdiff does not account for any version control on its own. This means that if you want to visually highlight the differences between two versions of a version controlled Latex file, you are required to manually checkout the two different versions ahead of comparing them with latexdiff. In case you are using git as your version control system, this is where git-latexdiff comes into play. It accounts for checking out the different version of a Latex file as well as comparing them with latexdiff in a single command: you only need to specify which latex file and versions should be used for the comparison.

Preconditions

Ensure you have git, a latex distribution (e.g. texlive-full), and latexdiff installed and available in the path of your CLI.

git-latexdiff installation

Clone git-latexdiff:

git clone https://gitlab.com/git-latexdiff/git-latexdiff#

Follow instructions in the README. This will involve a:

sudo make install

in most cases on an Ubuntu system. If all went well “git latexdiff” should be available in your CLI (it should print the help message):

user@machine:~$ git latexdiff

fatal: Please, provide at least one revision to diff with.
Usage: git latexdiff [options] OLD [NEW]
 git latexdiff [options] OLD --
 git latexdiff [options] -- OLD
Call latexdiff on two Git revisions of a file.

OLD and NEW are Git revision identifiers. NEW defaults to HEAD.
If "--" is used for NEW, then diff against the working directory.

Options:
 --help this help message
 --help-examples show examples of usage
 --main <file> name of the main LaTeX, R Sweave,
 or Emacs Org mode file.
 The search for the only file containing 'documentclass'
 will be attempted, if not specified.
 For non-LaTeX files, a reasonable `prepare` command
 will be used unless explicitly provided
 --no-view don't display the resulting PDF file
 --latex run latex instead of pdflatex
 --bibtex, -b run bibtex as well as latex
 (pdflatex,bibtex,pdflatex,pdflatex)
 --biber run BibLaTex-Biber as well as latex
 (pdflatex,bibtex,pdflatex,pdflatex)
 --view view the resulting PDF file
 (default if -o is not used)
 --pdf-viewer <cmd> use <cmd> to view the PDF file (default: $PDFVIEWER)
 --no-cleanup don't cleanup temp dir after running
 --no-flatten don't call latexpand to flatten the document
 --cleanup MODE Cleanup temporary files according to MODE:

- keeppdf (default): keep only the
 generated PDF file

- none: keep all temporary files
 (may eat your diskspace)

- all: erase all generated files.
 Problematic with --view when the
 viewer is e.g. evince, and doesn't
 like when the file being viewed is
 deleted.

--latexmk use latexmk
 --latexopt pass additional options to latex (e.g. -shell-escape)
 -o <file>, --output <file>
 copy resulting PDF into <file> (usually ending with .pdf)
 Implies "--cleanup all"
 --tmpdirprefix where temporary directory will be created (default: /tmp).
 Relative path will use repository root as a base
 --verbose, -v give more verbose output
 --quiet redirect output from subprocesses to log files
 --prepare <cmd> run <cmd> before latexdiff (e.g. run make to generate
 included files)
 --ln-untracked symlink uncommited files from the working directory
 --version show git-latexdiff version.
 --subtree checkout the tree at and below the main file
 (enabled by default, disable with --whole-tree)
 --whole-tree checkout the whole tree (contrast with --subtree)
 --ignore-latex-errors keep on going even if latex gives errors, so long as
 a PDF file is produced
 --ignore-makefile ignore the Makefile, build as though it doesn't exist
 -* other options are passed directly to latexdiff
 --bbl shortcut to flatten a bbl file of the same name as the project
 --latexpand OPT pass option OPT to latexpand. Use multiple times like
 --latexpand OPT1 --latexpand OPT2 to pass multiple options.
 --latexdiff-flatten use --flatten from latexdiff instead of latexpand

Unrecognized options are passed unmodified to latexdiff.

git-latexdiff usage

The main CLI usage of git-latexdiff is:

git latexdiff --main YOURFILE OLD_HASH [NEW_HASH]

A bunch of useful options are available for git-latexdiff. For example:

-v # good in case you run into any errors
--cleanup keeppdf # delete the checked-out 'old' and 'new' folders but keep the pdf
--cleanup all # delete all generated files afterwards
--output FILE # copy pdf before deleting it to FILE (disables automatically viewing the pdf). good in combination with --cleanup all
--tmpdirprefix ./FOLDERNAME/ # alternative to the above: specify where temporary stuff is stored, makes it easier to access diff files. good in combination with --cleanup keeppdf
--bibtex # also run bibtex
--biber # also run biber

Therefore, the command you might want to run therefore might be similar to this:

git latexdiff --main MYFILE.tex --bibtex --output git-latexdiff.pdf --cleanup all OLD_HASH NEW_HASH

…where you can specify

--

as NEW_HASH, if you want to run git latexdiff against the current (possibly unstaged/uncommited) version of the file, or where you can leave out NEW_HASH completely, if you want to run it against the last commit. Or your command might look similar to this:

mkdir git-latexdiff; git latexdiff --main MYFILE.tex --tmpdirprefix ./git-latexdiff/ --cleanup keeppdf OLD_HASH

 

Rhythmbox is silent: reset pulseaudio configuration

Rhythmbox is silent?

After playing around with different Linux Shells/UIs/window managers (including i3, Gnome Shell, etc) and some frequent restarts, I noticed that for some reason my music player Rhythmbox had stopped playing any sounds. Though it was still “playing” songs, no sounds were actually made by speakers, headphones, etc. In contrast, all other sounds were OK, including OS sounds like info/error messages, or other players like VLC. Changing sound setting, volumes, as well as changing audio devices did not have any effect on this.

Resetting pulseaudio configuration

Turns out that the pulseaudio configuration was messed up. The solution to this problem is to move/delete the old configuration, then let it be recreated (the original problem description and solution to this is here):

mv ~/.config/pulse/ ~/.config/pulse_old/ # move/delete the old config
pulseaudio -k # restart pulseaudio

After doing this and restarting Rhythmbox its sound should be back to normal, – though you might need to restart the OS if you run into problems with external speakers/headphones.

i3 window manager: quick setup and configuration

February 5, 2017 Leave a comment

i3_window_manager_screenshot

i3 example [Wikipedia]

The i3 window manager is a tiling window manager: it enables power users to operate/arrange/manage application windows in a very fast way in tiles, without any requirements to use a mouse. Alex Booker provides an excellent introduction and overview to the i3 window manager, which is divided into 3 videos: general introduction, configuration, and (visual) fine tuning. In this post we summarize the i3 configuration we use atm for a quick lookup (which is partially based on Alex Booker’s videos).

Installation


sudo apt-get install i3

Logout, then login to i3. The i3 configuration wizard starts automatically if there is no i3 configuration file yet (we recommend using Super as the mod key at this point, because Alt is used by a huge amount of applications for other tasks). You can always remove the i3 config file at ~/.config/i3/config and start the wizard again using i3-config-wizard.

Basic usage

We strongly recommend to go through all the shortcuts in the official i3 reference card (it just takes a moment and is the core of how you will operate i3 afterwards). Be aware that if you are using an alternative keyboard layout, i3 automatically detects which keys are located at the positions that i3 would normally use – so you will be able to use the same physical keys, even if you are using a completely different layout.

After being aware of the basic usage of i3, skimming through the official i3 user’s guide will make sense. This should highlight the possibilities with i3 (in both how to operate i3 and how to configure it), which will make later configuration tasks easier by far.

i3 config file

The main i3 config is located in ~/.config/i3/conf. This file is created by i3-config-wizard at first and can be modified as wished afterwards.

Be aware that changing any i3 config at least requires i3 to be reloaded (“restarted in place”) with Mod+Shift+R. Some configuration also require the underlying application that is started/controlled by i3 (e.g. compton) to be restarted. If i3 restarts those applications on each reload depends on its configuration (that’s the difference between exec and exec_always in the config file). If the underlying application was started with exec, restarting the application by hand or logging out/loging back in is required.

(Re)starting i3 from command line

To start i3 from a native tty command line:

DISPLAY=:0 # or :1 etc...
export DISPLAY
# killall i3 # required in case i3 is running
i3 -c .config/i3/config

To instead restart a running i3 from a native tty command line:

i3-msg reload
i3-msg restart

Media buttons etc.

Most likely i3 does not recognize your media buttons correctly from the beginning. You at first need playerctl to enable control over (parts) of the media buttons, of which you can get different packages (including .deb) here. The i3 FAQ then provides a config snippet that can be copied (appended) to your i3 config file to map keys to the media buttons. Be aware that the number of the pulse audio device may be different (in the script it’s 0, but for others it might e.g. be 1). If e.g. the buttons cause the currently focused window to flicker, but the volume does not change, this might be an indication for using the wrong device. If you want to specify the player that you control with the play/pause/next/previous buttons via playerctl buttons, you use the –player parameter, e.g. –player=rhythmbox. Be sure that the player provides an MPRIS D-Bus interface (e.g. vlc, audacious, spofity, etc). With Rhythmbox, for example, the corresponding plugin has to be enabled first.

Set wallpaper

You need e.g. feh to set a wallpaper in i3:


sudo apt-get install feh

By adding the following to your i3 config file you always set the wallpaper when i3 is started/reloaded:


exec_always feh --bg-scale /path/to/your/wallpaper.jpg

For different wallpaper scaling options, check out the man page of feh (it provides e.g. –bg-center, –bg-fill, –bg-max, –bg-scale, –bg-tile, …)

Launch applications on specified workspaces

At first, you need to find out the xprop window class of your target application. For this, start xprop and click on the application window. The 2nd string under WM_CLASS(STRING) is the string you need to know in the next step: add the following line to your i3 config file (and replace CLASS with the just determined string):


assign [class="CLASS"] 10

10 in this case indicates the nr. of the workspace the application window should be positioned.

Autostart applications

To automatically start applications, add one of the following lines to your i3 config file:


exec APPLICATION_COMMAND


exec_always APPLICATION_COMMAND

exec only executes the command when i3 is started, and exec_always executes the command each time i3 is reloaded. For example, starting your web browser is only useful for each fresh i3 start, but setting the wallpaper is useful to be done each time i3 is reloaded.

Monitor configuration

An easy way to configure the monitor setup using an UI is with arandr (UI for randr):


sudo apt-get install arandr

If you want to make a certain monitor configuration permanent you can a) configure monitors as wished in arandr, then b) save the configuration to a file, and c) add “exec_always CONFIG_FILE” to your i3 config file.

Wifi controls

i3 does not come with a built in UI for to control your wifi. To avoid configuring it via config files (which is still pretty cumbersome in Linux after all those years) you can use e.g. the graphical frontend wicd-gtk:


sudo apt-get install wicd-gtk
wicd-gtk

Change system fonts

One possible cosmetic improvement is to use different system fonts in i3. Alex recommends the Yosemite San Francisco Font: you can download it from its github page (under “manual install”), then change the font entry in the i3 config file to:


font pango:System San Francisco Display 10

Further, changing the font for the used gtk is recommended. You can do this is the gtk configuration file (in ~/gtkrc-2.0 and/or .config/gtk-3.0/…) by changing the font line to e.g.:


gtk-font-name="System San Franzisco 10"

Another option is to use the lxappearance config UI (but it currently seems buggy as not detecting all installed fonts correctly, as long they are not already in use with the system):


sudo apt-get install lxappearance
lxappearance

De-uglify i3

When you previously had Gnome Shell installed, you can use gnome-tweak-tool to configure your look-and-feel and add the following line to your i3 config file to “de-uglify” i3 at startup:

exec --no-startup-id gnome-settings-daemon

For further/other configuration or if the above approach does not work for you you can try lxappearance, gtk-chtheme, and qt4-config:

sudo apt-get install lxappearance gtk-chtheme qt4-qtconfig

Replace dmenu with rofi


sudo apt-get install rofi

In the i3 config file, replace the dmenu-shortcut with e.g.


bindsym $mod+a exec rofi -show run -lines 20 -eh 1.3 -opacity "85" -bw 0 -font "System San Francisco Display 10"

or, to have different colors:


set $bg-color   #2f343f
set $text-color #f3f4f5
bindsym $mod+a exec rofi -show run -lines 20 -eh 1.3 -opacity "90" -bw 0 -bc "$bg-color" -bg "$bg-color" -fg "$text-color" -hlbg "$text-color" -hlfg "$bg-color" -font "System San Francisco Display 10"

Transparency and fading effects

i3 does not provide for transparency or fading effects itself (it has less purpose in doing so, as e.g. windows don’t overlap in a tiling arrangement). To add those, use e.g. compton:


sudo apt-get install compton

and add “exec compton” to your i3 config file. The configuration is for compton is done via ~/.config/compton.conf, which you first have to copy from the example file location. With Ubuntu, this is:


cp /usr/share/doc/compton/examples/compton.sample.conf ~/.config/compton.conf

Afterwards, you can change settings there to your needs. We usually do the following:

  • Increase window fading speed, which is specified in milliseconds between fading steps: “”fade-delta = 5;”
  • Remove transparency from unfocused windows and menues (increases their readability). To do so, comment out “inactive-opacity” and “menu-opacity”.

Replace the i3status bar (bottom/top bar) with i3blocks


sudo apt-get install i3blocks

Copy the example i3blocks config file:


cp /etc/i3blocks.conf ~/.config/i3/i3blocks.conf

And change the value of the “status_command” from “i3status” with “i3blocks -c ~/.config/i3/i3blocks.conf” in your i3 config file.

Then you can customize i3blocks in your ~/.config/i3/i3blocks.conf file. For example:

  • Set the interval of date/time to 1 to have a 1s time update interval.
  • For volume add “command=/usr/share/i3blocks/volume 5 pulse” and set the interval 1 to use the pulse audio volume level with 1s interval.
  • Replace the text of labels with character/utf-8 icons as you like – this saves space in the bar. Alex has some nice examples for this in his own config file on github.

Update notification in i3blocks

The following script checks and prints if updates are available and if a reboot is required after updates:

#!/bin/bash                                                                                                        

# count how many updates we have got
ups=`/usr/lib/update-notifier/apt-check --human-readable | head -1 | awk '{print $1;}'`

# print the results
if [ "$ups" -eq "1" ]
then
  echo "There is 1 update"
elif [ "$ups" -gt "1" ]
then
  echo "There are $ups updates"
elif [ -f /var/run/reboot-required ]; then
     echo 'Reboot required'
else
  echo "Up to date"
fi

This script can be included in i3blocks by adding the following to in the i3blocks config file:

# Update status
[updates]
label=
interval=3600
command=/path/to/update/status/script/from/above

Workspaces on predefined screens

For users using a multi-monitor setup configuring to which screen specific workspace automatically go might be interesting:


# put workspaces on specific screens
workspace 1 output HDMI-1
workspace 2 output DVI-I-1
...

More i3 shortcuts

  • Auto back-and-forth: after switching from workspace A to workspace B, pressing the shortcut for workspace B again to switch back to workspace A. Add “workspace_auto_back_and_forth yes” to enable this feature.

Application configuration

Usability of some applications benefits from some more configuration:

  • The new mail attention add-on for Thunderbird makes i3 raise the urgent notification flag for new mails, so that the corresponding workspace is highlighted.
  • Enabling the “Message Notification” add-on in Pidgin makes i3 raise the urgent notification flag for new messages, so that the corresponding workspace is highlighted.

More hints

As i3 does not come with a built in network configuration UI: to configure networks like VPNs you can use the following (parts of the network-manager and network-manager-gnome packages):

  • nm-connection-editor allows editing network settings
  • nmtui allows for activating/deactivating networks over the command line

i3 does also not come with a built in UI for configuring computer mice. The mouse pointer speed can be adapted with xinput:

  • use “xinput –list –short” to determine the name of your mouse device, then
  • “xinput –set-prop “MOUSE DEVICE NAME” “Device Accel Constant Deceleration” 1.8″ to change the mouse pointer speed. The latter can be added to the i3 config file to automatically keep the speed after a restart of i3.

Backup your i3 configuration

Most (if not all) i3 configuration is located in those 3 files, which consequently are the only ones that need to be backed up:


~/.config/i3/config
~/.config/i3/i3blocks.conf
~/.config/compton.conf

Categories: Linux, Misc